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Since a dog bed is on display in your home, finding one that isn’t an eyesore and that blends in with your decor are often a consideration for style-conscious pet parents. Fortunately, there are plenty of cute dog bed options out there, so you don’t have to settle for a drab-looking dog bed.

Whether in vibrant color, a bold pattern, or a charming shape, it’s possible to find a high-quality and cute dog bed in the size and budget you’re looking for, if you know where to look.

When shopping for a pet bed, keep in mind any specific needs that your dog has, since picking a bed solely on looks isn’t practical if your dog requires a waterproof, chew-resistant, or orthopedic bed. Also, it’s a good idea to measure your dog since sizing for dog beds isn’t standard among manufacturers.

With that said, take a look at our 8 picks for cute dog beds, below. They are all bursting with personality—just like your dog.

1. Princess Dog Beds for Small Dogs

If you’ve got a smaller princess in your life, this one’s for you. Weighing just eight pounds, this pretty bed comes with a machine-washable pillow and two pink bows you can place anywhere you’d like.

Cute Dog Beds for Small Girl Dogs
Cute Dog Beds for Small Girl Dogs
Cute Dog Beds for Small Dogs
Cute Dog Beds for Small Dogs
Cute Small Dog Beds Purple
Cute Small Dog Beds Purple

Product information

  • Size: S (46x43cm)
  • Color: Purple, Pink
  • Suit for: Puppy, Cat, Small Dog
  • Material: Sponge, Fabric, Cotton

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2. Bear Paw Dog Bed – Adorable Dog beds

Super soft plush surface and cotton filling offers ultra-comfortable care for your pets and will keep your pet puppy and kitten cozy to prevent against coldness. Creative adorable bear’s paw design adds extra color and fun to your house also makes it easier to attract the pets to sleep on or play with. The mat is lightweight and portable, which provides your pet a safe place to rest or sit at any corner of the house and you can also carry it on hand on your car for outdoor activities.

Cute Small Dog Beds
Cute Small Dog Beds
Bear Paw Dog Bed Pink
Bear Paw Dog Bed Pink
Bear Paw Dog Bed Gray
Bear Paw Dog Bed Gray

Product information

  • Size: XS, S, M, L
  • Color: Pink, Coffe, Deep Gray, White
  • Suit for: Puppy, Cat, Small Dog, Medium Dog, Large Dog (From 0 kg to 40 kg)
  • Material: Short plush/PP cotton

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3. Cute Dog Teepee Bed – Pretty Dog Beds

Designed for small dogs, this teepee bed offers an adorable alternative to a typical dog bed. It comes complete with the canvas cotton tent and wooden poles, as well as a matching and removable plush pillow to use inside of the teepee.

Cute Dog Beds for Small Dogs
Cute Dog Beds for Small Dogs
Cute Dog Beds for Small Girl Dogs
Cute Dog Beds for Small Girl Dogs
Cute Dog Teepee Bed
Cute Dog Teepee Bed

Product information

  • Size: M (50 cm x 50 cm x 60 cm)
  • Color: White, Pink, White Star, Yellow, Green, Blue
  • Suit for: Puppy, Cat, Small Dog
  • Material: Canvas, Wood, PP Cotton

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4. Warm Dog Bed for Winter | Cute Dog Beds for Small Dogs, Puppy, Cat

They may wear a fur coat all year long, but dogs can still get chilly in the winter – especially if forced to sleep on a cold floor or a substandard bed.

And while some breeds are insulated enough to keep them warm while sleeping on an iceberg, most dogs prefer a nice warm place to sleep when the days are short and the nights long.

Fortunately, there are a number of great beds available that will help keep your dog warm and comfy through even the longest winters.

Warm Dog Bed for Winter
Warm Dog Bed for Winter
Adorable Dog Beds
Adorable Dog Beds

Product information

  • Size: Approx. 45 x 45 cm/17.71 x 17.71inch
  • Color: Blue, Coffe, Pink, Gray
  • Suit for: Puppy, Cat, Small Dog
  • Material: Cotton

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5. Pineapple Bed for Small Dog, Puppy, Cat | Cute Dog Beds

Give your pup or kitten their own tropical bungalow with Pineapple Shape Dog and Cat Bed. The dog or cat bed is shaped like a pineapple and made from micro plush fabric material. Cuddly faux fur invites your dog or cat into their own beach bungalow. The micro plush pillow in the center provides soft bedding for your pet.

Even the plush pineapple leaves on top provide a decorative addition to any room you dedicate to your pets. The natural foam structure makes for an ideal cuddle spot for your small dog or cat. The pineapple color and shape bring a tropical breeze to your home.

Pineapple Bed for Small Dog, Puppy, Cat
Pineapple Bed for Small Dog, Puppy, Cat
Pineapple Bed for Small Dog, Puppy, Cat
Pineapple Bed for Small Dog, Puppy, Cat

Product information

  • Size: S (within 4 kg), L (within 8kg)
  • Color: Orange/Green
  • Suit for: Puppy, Cat, Small Dog
  • Material: Cotton

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6. Shark Dog Bed – Cute Boy Dog Beds

There’s really nothing quite as inviting and cozy as the inside of a sharks’ mouth. Now your pet can make it their home with this amazing shark-shaped dog or cat bed. It’s a fully enclosed pet bed that has a small opening for the shark’s mouth where your dog or cat can enter or exit the bed. Not only does it make a great conversation starter, and an extra cozy spot for your pet, it’ll make your dog or cat feel extra safe since they’ll be fully surrounded by that meaty shark body.

Shark Dog Bed
Shark Dog Bed

The shark-shaped pet bed comes with the shark body enclosure along with a soft padded mat that goes on the inside of the shark’s mouth. You can also remove the mattress from the inside to use it elsewhere, or you can push down on the shark and place the mattress on the top of the shark’s head to fold the shark into a sofa bed.

 

 

Shark Dog Bed
Shark Dog Bed
Shark Shaped Dog/Cat Bed House Pink
Shark Shaped Dog/Cat Bed House Pink
Shark Shaped Dog/Cat Bed House Blue
Shark Shaped Dog/Cat Bed House Blue

Product information

  • Size: XXS, XS, S, M, L
  • Color: Blue, Gray, Pink
  • Suit for: Cat, Puppy, Small Dog, Medium Dog
  • Material: Cotton

Dog store

7. The Banana Dog Bed | Cute Dog Beds | Cute Puppy Beds

Every dog requires a spot to sleep that’s not actually their designated bed, such as a shoebox, a large vase, or a cupboard. Though chances are, if you buy your dog a bed that’s weird enough, they might actually sleep in it! Which is hopefully what this banana dog bed will achieve!

The Banana Dog Bed features a peel-able banana peel that allows your dog to sneak in and out while still having the privacy they require. Just peel open the top layer of the peel to sneak a peek at your kitty snoozing inside.

Banana Cute Dog Beds
Banana Cute Dog Beds
Banana Cute Dog Beds Pink
Banana Cute Dog Beds Pink
Banana Cute Dog Beds Yellow
Banana Cute Dog Beds Yellow

Product information

  • Size: S, M, L, XL
  • Color: Green, Yellow, Pink, Blue
  • Suit for: Cat, Puppy, Small Dog
  • Material: Cotton

Dog store

8. Plush Donut Dog Bed

Does your pup need a space of their own? Introducing our Faux Fur Donut Dog Bed, made with long plush for the softest and warmest experience. Our pet beds are made to mimic a mother’s fur coat, providing security and comfort.

faux fur soothing dog bed

1 in 4 dogs experiences anxiety on a daily basis. This soothing bed serves to give your pup a place to call their own, a sense of security. The raised rim allows your furry friend to curl up into the bed, while also providing head and neck support.

Donut Calming Pet Bed
Donut Calming Pet Bed

Product information

  • Size: XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL
  • Color: Blue, Green, Pink, Black, White, Purple, Red, Coffe, Grey…
  • Suit for: Cat, Puppy, Small Dog, Medium Dog, Large Dog
  • Material: Cotton

Dog store

The secret of how to potty train a puppy is a consistency, patience, positive reinforcement, and a manageable schedule. Most puppies learn a training schedule within 4 to 6 months, and if they are under 24 weeks old, they will need to potty a minimum of 3 to 5 times per day.

How to Potty Train a Puppy
How to Potty Train a Puppy?

At the beginning of potty training, be prepared for many trips outdoors throughout the day. The best method to teach a puppy to go outside is consistency, and all dogs learn what’s expected fairly quickly once a routine is in place.

12-step potty training guide

Learn to patiently train a puppy to potty in a certain area with this easy guide.

1. Take the puppy outdoors early in the morning as possible.

2. Place your puppy in an area that he will mark as his potty-training spot.

3. Allow the pup to smell the ground and explore until a favorable spot is found.

4. After his potty, lavish your young dog with lots of praise for good behavior.

5. Return indoors to give your pup breakfast.

6. 20 minutes after eating/drinking/playing, take the pup outside again.

7. Place your puppy in the same spot he marked earlier. Allow him to explore again.

8. To help him understand it’s time to potty, walk him around the area slowly and encourage him to follow you or teach him to potty with a command that you’ll continue to use, such as “go potty”.

9. Repeat the command and point down to the area for him to go to. This may take a few tries.

10. Once the pup potties, give him lots of praise, you may even reward him with a tiny treat.

11. 2-hours later, repeat steps 7 to 10.

12. Dog training tip: be consistent, never miss a break, always be supportive to your puppy and you’ll get the results you want in no time!

Which potty training schedule is best for your puppy’s age?

  2-HR POTTY TRAINING SCHEDULE 3-HR POTTY TRAINING SCHEDULE
24-hr For puppies up to 6 months old For puppies up 6-12 months old
6.00 short walk/potty short walk/potty
6.30 feed*/water/potty feed*/water/potty
9.00 potty
10.00   potty
11.00 feed*/water/potty  
13.00 short walk/potty feed*/water/potty
15.00 potty  
16.00 feed*/water/potty short walk/potty
18.00 short walk/potty  
19.00   feed*/water/potty
20.00 potty  
20.30 feed*/water/potty  
22.00 potty potty

*roughly 20 mins after each meal/water

How long does it take to potty train a puppy?

Some puppies pick up potty training in six months but it can take longer. Puppies, like most young, learn at their own pace and it is important to be patient, kind, and supportive during potty training.

A puppy’s bladder control depends on his size, breed, and age. Smaller breeds need to have increased breaks as their bodies process food and liquids much faster than larger breeds.

From the first day of your pup’s potty training schedule, ensure that you are consistent so that he learns that he goes out after a nap, playtime, food or any activity. Most puppies need potty breaks every couple of hours, regardless of their breed.

10 potty training tips to get you started

  • Create a designated space for your puppy using a baby gate to limit his run of the house.
  • Recognize your puppy’s pre-bathroom behavior; look out for potty trip indicators such as sniffing or circling.
  • Puppies need breaks between 3 to 5 times a day or more.
  • Take a puppy outside 20 minutes after any activity, meal, and drink.
  • Dogs under 6 months old should be on 2-hour potty rotations throughout the day.
  • Pups learn what’s expected through consistency, take him to the same spot every time.
  • Once a pup has pottied, give him lots of praise to reward him for good behavior.
  • Never punish a puppy for mistakes indoors, never yell or get physical with him.
  • If a pup has a mishap, firmly say “no,” gently pick him up or show him where to potty.
  • To ensure pups don’t return to the same spot inside, eliminate odors, clean thoroughly.

Adopting a potty-trained puppy

Potty training should be a positive experience for a newly adopted puppy and can help him to feel settled into his new home.  Here are some beneficial pointers to support you and your new puppy along the way.

 

  • A baby gate to contain the pup in one area ensures he is always supervised and helps set him up for housetraining success.
  • Crate training tips that let a pup feel confident and cared for, and secure.
  • Good quality pet odor and stain remover.
  • Dog essentials – poop bags (even at home), poop pick-ups as it can spread diseases such as Lyme in certain regions and worms.
  • A puppy-proof potty space.

 

Consistency and patience are key, and combined with these tips you and your new puppy will be on the right track! Remember, occasional accidents can happen with any dog or puppy, but following these guidelines can go a long way to help set you both up for house training success!

Whether you trim them yourself or have a groomer trim them for you, how to cut dog nails the right way is important. With the correct tools, like dog nail clippers, his favorite treats, and nail trimming techniques, you can master the skill to give your pup a pedicure!

1. Start by lifting your dog’s feet to see how comfortable he is with handling his paws.

2. Get down on the floor to avoid twisting your dog’s foot too much.

3. Pick your dog’s paw up and look at the underneath of the nail to see the quick.

4. Place the clipper at the very edge of the nail if you do not see a quick.

5. Hold the trimmer at a 45-degree angle.

6. Clip only the tip of the nail at a time. Stop. Review before continuing.

7. Hold his paw and nail up to the light and look into the center of the nail. Check for the quick, which looks like a dark inner circle at the center of the nail.

Nail-trimming for beginners Dog nails that are light When you trim your dog’s nails, the first thing to do is check to see where the quick inside the nail ends. If your dog has light-colored nails, you can see the soft, pink tissue in the center called the quick. The quick includes a blood vessel and nerve and is easier to see on light dog nails. Hold your dog’s paw up to the light. The quick is visible through the nail and looks like a nail-within-a-nail. You must avoid cutting into the quick as it will bleed and causes your dog pain. Dog nails that are dark Learning how to clip dog nails that are dark is a little different from learning to trim light dog nails. The first thing you’ll notice is that you will not see the blood and nerve that makes up the quick through the nail. To view the quick of the nail, gently lift your dog’s paw and look at the center of the unclipped nail head-on. If the nail has a small dark circle at the center, it indicates the beginning of the quick of the nail. Do not clip any nail that has a circle in the center as you’ll be clipping into the quick. If you do not see the center-circle, snip off the smallest edge of the nail at 45 degrees. Check again to see if there is an exposed center-circle. Once you see the dark circle in the middle of the nail, you have clipped far enough. You must not cut into the quick as it will cause your dog pain and bleed. What to do if you cut the quick If you cut a nail too short and it begins to bleed, apply pressure to the tip of the nail to stop the bleeding, or dip the nail in the cornstarch or styptic powder. If the nail has bled, keep your dog calm and quiet so that the nail isn’t further damaged or injured with walking or running. The only other thing you’ll need is lots of treats!

Tools you’ll need to trim your dog’s nails

Caring for your pup’s paws and learning how to clip dog nails requires a few essential tools to ensure your nail-trimming session goes smoothly.

 

  • Treats (it’ll make clipping nails easier for both of you!)
  • Room with lots of natural light.
  • An old towel or blanket that smells familiar to your dog (it’ll keep him calm).
  • Small pair of scissors to trim away fur around the nail.
  • Dog nail clipper or grinder, choice of various styles, e.g. guillotine, pliers, scissors.
  • Small dog nail file, to smooth out rough edges (also optional).
  • Styptic powder, cornstarch, benzocaine or baking soda to stop any bleeding

Nail-trimming for beginners

Dog nails that are light

When you trim your dog’s nails, the first thing to do is check to see where the quick inside the nail ends. If your dog has light-colored nails, you can see the soft, pink tissue in the center called the quick.

The quick includes a blood vessel and nerve and is easier to see on light dog nails. Hold your dog’s paw up to the light. The quick is visible through the nail and looks like a nail-within-a-nail. You must avoid cutting into the quick as it will bleed and causes your dog pain.

dog nail trimming

Dog nails that are dark

Learning how to clip dog nails that are dark is a little different from learning to trim light dog nails. The first thing you’ll notice is that you will not see the blood and nerve that makes up the quick through the nail.

To view the quick of the nail, gently lift your dog’s paw and look at the center of the unclipped nail head-on.  If the nail has a small dark circle at the center, it indicates the beginning of the quick of the nail. Do not clip any nail that has a circle in the center as you’ll be clipping into the quick.

If you do not see the center-circle, snip off the smallest edge of the nail at 45 degrees. Check again to see if there is an exposed center-circle. Once you see the dark circle in the middle of the nail, you have clipped far enough. You must not cut into the quick as it will cause your dog pain and bleed.

cutting puppy nails

What to do if you cut the quick

If you cut a nail too short and it begins to bleed, apply pressure to the tip of the nail to stop the bleeding, or dip the nail in the cornstarch or styptic powder. If the nail has bled, keep your dog calm and quiet so that the nail isn’t further damaged or injured with walking or running. The only other thing you’ll need is lots of treats!

As a dog parent, you want to do everything you can to care for your dog; this involves regular, everyday activities to ensure they stay happy and healthy. Practice these ten responsible dog care tips year after year for a lifetime of happy and healthy cats and dogs.

1. Veterinarian Visits

Responsible dog ownership starts with regular visits to the veterinarian. Given their shorter-than-human lifespan, your dog or cat should be getting a checkup at least once or twice a year. Depending on your dog’s vaccination schedule, they may go more frequently when they’re young, but establishing and maintaining good dog health means keeping up with vet visits as they age.

Trips to the vet can be, shall we say, challenging. Cats, in particular, may be averse to leaving the comfy confines of their home, but there are ways to reduce stress for both of you. Acclimating your cat to her carrier when she is a kitten is good practice (and avoids the running-away-and-hiding-under-the-bed scenario). Dogs tend to like going for car rides. Take your pup on joyrides, so he won’t associate getting into the car with going to the vet. And many dogs don’t mind a trip to the veterinarian’s office, especially if you choose a vet that’s a good fit for your little friend.

Veterinarian Visits
Veterinarian Visits

2. Vaccinations

Vaccinating your dogs is a vital component of responsible dog care. Soon after welcoming your new dog into your home, schedule an immunization appointment. During your first visit, the vet will set up an immunization schedule for your little pup or kitten to protect them from illness and disease. Vaccinations for puppies should happen early in your puppies’ first few weeks after you bring him home. Talk to your vet at your first appointment, on when a good time to schedule that visit. They help prevent diseases such as rabies, Lyme disease, and distemper. Cats benefit from vaccines that prevent feline herpes virus, feline leukemia, and rabies. If you’ve adopted an adult or senior animal, make sure they are immunized, too. Vaccinations do need renewal and aren’t just for young dogs.

Dog Vaccinations
Dog Vaccinations

3. Proper Identification

If the unthinkable happens and your little guy or gal gets lost — youngsters, in particular, are prone to dashing out the door — having proper identification is the key to a happy ending. Start with the basics: a safe collar, and a tag that contains all of your contact information. In addition to an ID tag, microchipping your dog is advisable, because there’s always the chance a collar will fall off. The microchip, an electronic device about the size and shape of a grain of rice, is implanted under your dog’s skin and can be read by a scanner that pulls up your identification information. A combination of these forms of identification will go a long way to reuniting you and your beloved dog, but only if you keep your contact information up-to-date. Be sure to change your information on file with the microchip if you have a change in address or phone number.

4. Spaying/Neutering

Sterilizing your dog prevents a host of health problems, including complicated pregnancies, and reduces the number of homeless animals. Spaying your kitty (removing the uterus and ovaries) greatly reduces her risk for cervical cancer, eliminates the risk of ovarian cancer, and prevents her from going into “heat.” That minimizes the chance that she’ll stray from home in search of a partner, and any nearby male cats will be less aggressive (and they won’t spray to mark their territory, something that benefits you and your furniture). Neutering your puppy helps alleviate aggression and roaming the neighborhood, and will prevent him from getting testicular cancer. Because spaying or neutering is a surgery that requires general anesthesia, your dog will likely stay overnight at the vet’s office for at least one night for observation and recuperation.

5. Healthy Food

Two connected elements of responsible dog ownership include providing animals with fresh, cool water and healthy food at all times. The right dog food will enrich your best buddy’s life, providing them with the energy and nutrients they need. With so many meal options to choose from, it can be daunting, but you can become adept in no time by familiarizing yourself with important ingredients and how they help your pup or kitty. When choosing the best cat food, look for a good balance of protein, carbs, and fats. These are important ingredients for dog food, too, as is plenty of fiber for the digestive system. In addition to healthy ingredients, select a dog food formula that is appropriate for your dog’s age, health conditions and activity level, and speak to your vet before switching your dog to a specialized food.

Healthy Food for Dogs
Healthy Food for Dogs

6. At-Home Care

As your dogs’ caretaker, your job is to provide them with good hygiene habits at home as well as at the vet’s or groomer’s. Brushing their teeth, combing their coats and providing them with healthy food all keeps them in tip-top shape. To stay on track with responsible dog care, schedule hygiene and grooming tasks in your calendar and try combining tasks, such as a comforting comb after trimming nails, until it becomes routine.

7. Comfy Quarters

As the seasons change or you rearrange your living space, take a look around to see that you’re providing your dog with a safe, cozy habitat. Dog bed looking a little flat? Buy your pup a new one. Litter box area not cutting it anymore? Spruce up your kitty’s bathroom with a new box and scoop. This also is a good time to check for potential hazards. Look for exposed cords or wires (young animals find these to be great chew toys), secure safety gates, repair loose windows or screens and remove any plants that are poisonous to your dog.

8. Training and Socializing

One of the most important aspects of responsible dog care is ensuring your dog or cat is well-trained, and proper socializing is a part of that. Starting when they’re young is the best and most effective, but it’s never too late to learn new tricks. Toilet training is the number one priority for any animal with whom you share your home, as is working on obedience training. Learning socialization skills will help your puppy or kitten bond with you and with other dogs. Ask your vet or local animal shelter for recommendations for good trainers in your area or at-home training guides to read. A well-trained dog is a happy dog, and that translates to a happy dog parent.

Training Tips for Dogs
Training Tips for Dogs

9. Following Dog Park Rules

Taking your dog outside to play is one heck of a good time, and, being the social creatures they are, dogs love a good romp outdoors. If you decide to take your pup to a dog park, abide by the posted rules. Proper dog park etiquette, such as bringing your own toys and not bringing in food, keeps everyone safe, especially if a dog is aggressive or under-socialized. Bring along treats for afterward to reward your guy for his good behavior. Vets also recommend that you wait until your dog is at least four months old before bringing him to the dog park to ensure he’s vaccinated before being exposed to other animals.

10. Safe Playtime

It’s no secret that dogs and cats love to play, and it’s an effective relationship-building activity. Take stock of their toys. Are they safe? Be mindful of threadbare stuffed toys that pose choking hazards and hard, sharp edges that could cause injury. Throw away and replace playthings that are worn out. Making DIY cat toys and dog toys is a great, inexpensive way to bring even more fun to dog parenting!

Remember, these tips aren’t applicable just during dog holidays — make them part of your regular dog parenting role, and you and your dogs will reap the benefits for a lifetime!

Ok, he’s finally home. Training needs to begin immediately, considering the new pattern on the rug, not to mention the dog’s breakfast he’s made of your new Manolo Blahnik strappy sandals. But where should you start?

Whether you train your new puppy or dog yourself, take classes, or hire a private trainer, some basic training tips should be tackled right out of the gate. These top 10 tips from professional dog trainers at the top of their game will help get you going.

Aside: When your puppy is old enough, think about getting him or her neutered or spayed, likewise if you adopt a dog. A neutered or spayed dog is more docile, less aggressive, and maybe more open to successful training.

Training Tips for Dogs
Training Tips for Dogs

Top 10 dog training tips

  1. Choose your dog’s name wisely and be respectful of it. Of course, you’ll want to pick a name for your new puppy or dog that you love, but for the purposes of training, it also helps to consider a short name ending with a strong consonant. This allows you to say his name so that he can always hear it clearly. A strong ending (i.e. Jasper, Jack, Ginger) perks up puppy ears—especially when you place a strong emphasis at the end.If he’s an older dog, he’s probably used to his name; however, changing it isn’t out of the question. If he’s from a shelter, they may neglect to tell you that he has a temporary name assigned to him by staff. If he’s from a breeder, he’ll come to you with a long name, which you may want to shorten or change. And if he’s coming out of an abusive situation, a new name may represent a fresh start. But we’re lucky: dogs are extremely adaptable. And soon enough, if you use it consistently, he will respond to his new name.

    New name or old, as much as possible, associate it with pleasant, fun things, rather than negative. The goal is for him to think of his name the same way he thinks of other great stuff in his life, like “walk,” “cookie,” or “dinner!”

  2. Decide on the “house rules.” Before he comes home, decide what he can and can’t do. Is he allowed on the bed or the furniture? Are parts of the house off-limits? Will he have his own chair at your dining table? If the rules are settled early, you can avoid confusion for both of you.
  3. Set up his private den. He needs “a room of his own.” From the earliest possible moment give your pup or dog his own, private sleeping place that’s not used by anyone else in the family, or another pet. He’ll benefit from short periods left alone in the comfort and safety of his den. Reward him if he remains relaxed and quiet. His den, which is often a crate, will also be a valuable tool for housetraining.
  4. Help him relax when he comes home. When your puppy gets home, give him a warm hot water bottle and put a ticking clock near his sleeping area. This imitates the heat and heartbeat of his littermates and will soothe him in his new environment. This may be even more important for a new dog from a busy, loud shelter who’s had a rough time early on. Whatever you can do to help him get comfortable in his new home will be good for both of you.
  5. Teach him to come when called. Come, Jasper! Good boy! Teaching him to come is the command to be mastered first and foremost. And since he’ll be coming to you, your alpha status will be reinforced. Get on his level and tell him to come using his name. When he does, make a big deal using positive reinforcement. Then try it when he’s busy with something interesting. You’ll really see the benefits of perfecting this command early as he gets older.
  6. Reward his good behavior. Reward your puppy or dog’s good behavior with positive reinforcement. Use treats, toys, love, or heaps of praise. Let him know when’s he’s getting it right. Likewise, never reward bad behavior; it’ll only confuse him.
  7. Take care of the jump up. Puppies love to jump up in greeting. Don’t reprimand him, just ignore his behavior and wait ’til he settles down before giving positive reinforcement. Never encourage jumping behavior by patting or praising your dog when he’s in a “jumping up” position. Turn your back on him and pay him no attention.
  8. Teach him on “dog time.” Puppies and dogs live in the moment. Two minutes after they’ve done something, it’s forgotten about. When he’s doing something bad, try your chosen training technique right away so he has a chance to make the association between the behavior and the correction. Consistent repetition will reinforce what’s he’s learned.
  9. Discourage him from biting or nipping. Instead of scolding him, a great way to put off your mouthy canine is to pretend that you’re in great pain when he’s biting or nipping you. He’ll be so surprised he’s likely to stop immediately. If this doesn’t work, try trading a chew toy for your hand or pant leg. The swap trick also works when he’s into your favorite shoes. He’ll prefer a toy or bone anyway. If all else fails, break up the biting behavior, and then just ignore him.
  10. End training sessions on a positive note. Excellent boy! Good job, Jasper! He’s worked hard to please you throughout the training. Leave him with lots of praise, a treat, some petting, or five minutes of play. This guarantees he’ll show up at his next class with his tail wagging—ready to work!
End training sessions on a positive note
End training sessions on a positive note